Chili – Lime Grilled Bluefish

Grilled bluefish is certainty a summer staple here on Long Island. Because of its higher fat content, bluefish should be handled with care to maintain quality. Bluefish should be thoroughly iced as soon as possible after they are caught and kept cold until they are eaten. To cut down on the strong oil flavor many cooks use goopy mayo based concoctions the slather all over the fish. I prefer to go with a less goopy and more healthy option – citrus. So here is a mildly spicy citrus marinade the goes wonderfully with healthy fatty fish.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 6 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 jalapenos, seeded and minced
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 bluefish fillet (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 2 red bell peppers, stemmed, cored and quartered

Combine the the lime juice, jalapenos, olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste in a large, shallow glass or ceramic dish. Cut diagonal slashes in the skin of the bluefish and place, skin side up, in the marinade. Spoon some of the marinade over the skin. Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours.

Preheat your charcoal grill to a nice hot temperature. Then, place the fish, skin side up, on the grill. Place the peppers on the grill. Grill the fish for 7 minutes. Turn it over carefully and grill until just cooked through, about 5 minutes more. Grill the peppers until charred, about 5 minutes per side.

Serve this with grilled corn on the cob, another summer staple here on Long Island.

Grilling Bluefish

 

Rolled Sole with Veggies

Sole, a nice simple filet lends itself to a very gentle method of cooking, steaming. Rolled up on a bed of mixed Chinese vegetables and steamed on a plate in the bamboo steamer… just a perfect fish to go with rice and wine.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 4 fresh sole fillets (about 5 ounces each)
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce, divided
  • 3 tablespoons dry white wine
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger root
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 large carrot, cut into julienne strips
  • 3 baby bok choys chopped
  • 3 tablespoons minced green onions and tops, divided

Combine 3 tablespoons of soy sauce, wine, ginger, onion powder and sugar in shallow dish. Then add the sole fillets letting is marinade for ten minutes, five minutes for each side.

Meanwhile, toss carrot and bok choys together with remaining 1 tablespoon soy sauce in small bowl; pour off excess sauce. Transfer the vegetables to an 8-inch round heatproof plate.

Remove sole fillets from marinade; spread out flat. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons green onions evenly over fillets. Starting at thin end, roll up the fillets, and arrange them seam side down, on vegetables. Place plate on large steamer rack set in large pot or wok of boiling water. (Do not allow water level to reach plate.)

Cover and steam 12 minutes, or until fish flakes easily when tested with fork. Sprinkle remaining 1 tablespoon green onion evenly over fish once you’ve plated up the portions.

A Summer Classic… with Bacon!

Bacon and scallops straight from the sea, the scallops that is, the bacon comes straight from Western Beef (the thick cut bacon is the one I use). These are best tossed on an outdoor grill, but you can broil them indoors.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 2 lbs bacon
  • 2 lbs sea scallops (if very large, cut in half)
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1/3 cup chicken broth

Cut bacon strips in half and wrap a piece of bacon around each scallop; secure with toothpick. Then if you are cooking indoors: Arrange the wrapped scallops on a baking sheet and broil about 5 inches from heat for 3 minutes per side, or until bacon is crisp. If your cooking outdoors, I use a perforated cooking sheet over the grill on top of hot coals.

Make the sauce:  In small skillet, melt butter; add garlic and saute about 1 minute. Add broth and bring to a boil. Cook this for about 2 minutes to reduce.  Place scallops in large bowl; pour broth over, gently toss to coat. Now, if there were a bed of linguini in that bowl, well, it couldn’t hurt.

Bacon Wrapped Scallops

Bacon Wrapped Scallops

Rosé Summer Mussels

Every Mediterranean country has its version of shellfish in a tomato-based broth, and the wine of choice for each is an earthy, full-bodied pink wine. Here, seek out a nice sweet rosé, I sever these with a bottle of Martha Clara Vineyards sweet rosé.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 4 pounds mussels, scrubbed and debearded
  • 1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes drained
  • 1 onion, chopped fine
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 5 oz can v-8 juice
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried red-pepper flakes
  • 1/8 teaspoon fresh-ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup olive oil

In a large pot, heat the oil over moderately low heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in the parsley, tomatoes, v-8 Juice, thyme, and red-pepper flakes. Reduce the heat and simmer, partially covered, for 25 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Now, when it comes to the canned tomatoes and the v-8 juice, I use the low sodium option here. Too much sodium is not good for you and around here I’m all about cooking things that are good for you… most of the time. So lets get back to the mussels.

Discard any mussels that have broken shells or that don’t clamp shut when tapped. Add the mussels to the pot. Cover; bring to a boil. Cook, shaking the pot occasionally, just until the mussels open, about 3 minutes. Remove the open mussels. Continue to boil, uncovering the pot as necessary to remove the mussels as soon as their shells open. Discard any that do not open.

Stir the black pepper into the broth. Taste the broth and, if needed, add salt. Ladle the broth over the mussels and serve with the garlic toast.

mussles with tomato broth

mussels with tomato broth

Scrambled Eggs ‘All the Way’

Continuing the brunch thoughts from Tuesday, because brunch is one of the best ways to spend a summer weekend, I thought I would share the secret to mixing eggs and fish. Its a simple scrambled eggs with lox. The ‘all the way’ part of this dish comes from the red onion added to the eggs and lox. Out here in New York, a ‘Bagel all the way’ is one served with cream cheese, lox, and a slice of onion.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 4 medium to large eggs
  • 4 ounces of smoked salmon
  • 1/2 medium red onion diced
  • chopped chives for garnish

Beat eggs in a small bowl and set it aside. Melt the butter in nonstick pan over medium-low heat. Add lox and onion; cook, stirring, until warmed through, 2 to 4 minutes. Stir in egg mixture; increase heat to medium and scramble the eggs, stirring constantly, until nearly set, 3 to 4 minutes.

Now, remember, don’t cook the eggs all the way, nearly set. The eggs should finish their cooking after you’ve removed the pan from the heat. Otherwise the eggs will be over-cooked. Overcooked eggs will ring-out all their moisture after you plate them up. I’ve mentioned this before haven’t I?

To top off this dish, I serve it on top of a slightly toasted bagel and top the eggs with chopped chives.

scrambled eggs with lox

scrambled eggs with lox

Crabby Scrambled Eggs

A nice coastal brunch item combines leftover crab meat and eggs. I know, I know, who has leftovers, but it does occasionally happen… I’ve seen it on TV so it must be true. But, if you were making say, a crab salad, and you can reserve an couple of ounces, this is a nice morning-after treat.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 4 medium or large eggs
  • 2 ounces of crab meat
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh chopped tarragon
  • pinch of cayenne pepper
  • tablespoon of butter

Beat eggs and tarragon in a small bowl and set it aside. Sprinkle the crab meat with the cayenne pepper. Now, melt the butter in nonstick pan over medium-low heat. Add crab; cook, stirring, until warmed through, 2 to 4 minutes. Stir in egg mixture; increase heat to medium and scramble the eggs, stirring constantly, until nearly set, 3 to 4 minutes.

Now, remember, don’t cook the eggs all the way, nearly set. The eggs should finish their cooking after you’ve removed the pan from the heat. Otherwise the eggs will be over-cooked. Overcooked eggs will ring-out all their moisture after you plate them up.

crab scrambled eggs

crab scrambled eggs