Cod Fish Pie

An old English tradition, a fish pie is nutritious, easy and can be cheap to cook. Look for a nice seasonal sale on cod, but this recipe works well with any number of firm fleshy fish, pollock salmon, sea bass, even blue fish. You can see in this recipe fish, leeks, milk, butter and potatoes, a Fish Pie is an all-in-one supper dish. Some like to sprinkle a fish pie with grated cheese but this is optional.

Here’s what you’ll need

  • 8 ½ fl oz fish stock
  • 8 ½ fl oz milk + 2 tbsp for the potatoes
  • 12 oz of cod cut into chunks
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 to 4 cups of mashed potatoes
  • 2 oz butter
  • 1 medium sized leek, the white, washed and finely sliced
  • 2 oz all purpose flour
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
  • Salt and pepper

Heat the oven to 350 °

Pour the fish stock and milk into a large saucepan and bring to a gentle simmer. Add the fish pieces and bay leaf and poach for 5 minutes. Remove the fish pieces with a slotted spoon and keep to one side. Reserve the liqueur. Now, melt the butter in a medium sized saucepan over a medium heat. Add the sliced leeks and cook for about 5 minutes until the leeks are soft.

Whilst still hot, add the flour gradually and stir well with a wooden spoon, making a bit of rue here. Then, pour the fish liqueur into the pan and stir again, raise the temperature and cook for 3 minutes until the sauce is slightly thickened. Turn the heat off. Remove the bay leaf. Add the fish, chopped parsley and season with salt and pepper. Leave to one side.

Place the fish and sauce into an ovenproof dish, cover with a thick layer of mashed potatoes fluffed up with a fork.

Put the dish onto a baking sheet and cook in the center of the preheated oven for 20 – 30 minutes or until the sauce is bubbling beneath the potatoes. Serve immediately.

codfishpie

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Salmon Rosti (a fishy potato hashbrown)

Rosti is a Swiss type of potato cake made from coarsely grated potato. And, winter is a nice time to grab a can of salmon and make up something warm and tasty. There’s nothing like fish fresh from the pantry when its too cold to go out to the fresh fish shop.  Combine these two ideas and you get Salmon Rosti… and how about a little dill sauce.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 14 ounce can boneless, skinless wild Alaskan salmon, drained
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
  • 2 large eggs plus 1 large egg white, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or 3 teaspoons dried, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups frozen hash-brown shredded potatoes (about 12 ounces)
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1/3 cup reduced-fat sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon capers, rinsed and chopped
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice

Combine salmon, onion, eggs and egg white, mustard, 2 tablespoons fresh dill (or 2 teaspoons dried), pepper and salt in a large bowl. Add potatoes and stir to combine.

Preheat oven to 200°F.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Fill a 1-cup measure two-thirds full with the salmon mixture and firmly pack it down. Unmold into the pan and pat to form a 3-inch cake. Repeat, making 3 more cakes. Cover and cook until browned on the bottom, 3 to 5 minutes. Gently turn over and cook, covered, until crispy on the other side, 3 to 5 minutes more. Transfer the cakes to a baking dish; keep warm in the oven. Wipe out the skillet and cook 4 more cakes with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and the remaining salmon mixture.

Combine sour cream, capers, lemon juice and the remaining dill in a small bowl. Serve the salmon cakes with the dill sauce.

salmonrosti

Stewed Mushroom Side dish

The rich meaty flavor of mushrooms make them one of the most popular side dishes with most cuts of steak. Although I prefer to use the white mushrooms for this side dish, you could choose to use the meatier portabello.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 pound or so mixed mushrooms
  • 1/2 stick Butter
  • 2 onions, peeled and sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bunch fresh thyme, chopped, or 1 Tablespoon of dried
  • a sprinkle or two sea salt and freshly ground pepper
  • a splash or two of Duck Walk red wine
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream

Trim the mushrooms as needed, removing any tough stems. Cut the larger mushrooms into smaller pieces. Smaller mushrooms may be left whole or simply halved to show off their form. Rinse all the mushrooms well and roll them in a paper towel to dry them off.
Preheat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the butter, onions and garlic. Sauté until the onions just begin to turn golden brown. Add the mushrooms and continue. In a few minutes the mushrooms will release quite a bit of moisture and become a bit soupy.
Add the thyme and salt and pepper. Continue cooking until the mushrooms are tender and most of the moisture has evaporated, concentrating the flavor. Add a splash of wine and the cream. Continue simmering until the sauce has thickened once again. Stir in the green onions.

mushroom

Red Cabbage with Kielbasa

This is a really flavorful side dish that seems to be a winter staple around my table. The side dish of red cabbage is usually just that, pickled red cabbage and sometimes a little seasoning,  simple and straight forward, vegan friendly even. But, I sometimes take a different tack, carnivore’s red cabbage. Some times its bacon, some times its ham… today, its polish kielbasa bringing meat to the side.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 medium head of red cabbage
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 cup of diced kielbasa
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup red wine vinegar
  • ¼ tsp ground clove

Cut red cabbage into quarters and cut out the core and slice thin. Peel onion, cut in half and slice thin. In a dutch oven, begin browning the kielbasa. Then add the onions, cook for 2-3 minutes and add the red cabbage; braise the cabbage until just tender 3-5 minutes. Season with kosher salt & freshly ground pepper, to taste. Add ground cloves, brown sugar, and vinegar. Cover and simmer until the cabbage is cooked and tender— do not boil or overcook.  Cooking time is about 30 minutes low and slow to let the flavors really meld.

braised-red-cabbage2

Winter Flounder with White Wine

Winter flounder, unlike summer flounder is caught in estuaries close to shore. It’s a common fish caught when ice fishing, but we’ve had no ice around here this season.  You can tell the difference at the fish store by noticing the eyes. The winter flounder has its eyes on the right side of the body, white the summer flounder has its eyes on the left side. The winter flounder is a fish of choice when you want a light ‘white meat’ fillet. The Summer flounder tends to have a darker more ‘fishy’ fillet. So cooking the winter flounder in lighter aromatics like white wine, and serving it up with winter veggies makes a healthy addition to a new year’s menu.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 lb flounder fillets
  • ½ cup Duck Walk white wine
  • 1/3 cup minced onion
  • ½ cup fresh mushrooms, chopped
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • dash of sea salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Arrange fillets in a greased baking dish. Mix wine, onion, mushrooms, and seasonings together and pour over fish. Bake for 25 minutes or until fish is done. Serves 2. Very good served with wild rice and steamed squash.

icefishing

Wild Turkey BBQ Sauce

Did you know we have wild turkeys here on Long Island? They reside mostly on the east end in fields and Pine Barrens and suburban yards. Also, there is a three day hunting window for people to go and have a more authentic thanksgiving experience. Why defrost a large frozen bird when you can pluck a fresh lean one. But I digress. The wild turkey we’re talking about here is the one that comes from Kentucky. Yes, a little wild turkey goes a long way in making a great barbeque sauce.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1/2 onion, minced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 cup bourbon whiskey
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 2 cups ketchup
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 1/3 cup cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons liquid smoke flavoring
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar

In a large skillet over medium heat, combine the onion, garlic, and whiskey. Simmer for 10 minutes, or until onion is translucent. Mix in the ground black pepper, salt, ketchup, tomato paste, vinegar, liquid smoke, brown sugar, and a shot or two of hot pepper sauce if you’re into that sort of thing.

Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer for 20 minutes. Run sauce through a strainer if you prefer a smooth sauce.

Now that we have some barbeque sauce… we can brush a liberal amount on a couple of slices of pork shoulder, placing them in our crock pot. Put your crock pot on low and in eight hours or so… you will have some barbequed pulled pork bourbon style.

Wild_turkey_eastern_us

Bluefish with Mango Salsa

I know its January, and the winter is well set in. So why does H-Mart have a big sale on mangos and papayas? It is a mystery to me, but an inspiration also… blue fish with a Caribbean mango salsa. It’s an explosion of flavors that will convince you that winter is actually far far away.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Mango Salsa –

  • 1 papaya, peeled and diced
  • 2 mangoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 red sweet bell pepper, diced
  • 1/4 cup chopped red onion
  • 3 tablespoons cilantro, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 3 tablespoons orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons captain morgan’s dark spiced rum
  • 3 tablespoons shredded coconut
  • salt, to taste

Combine all these ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Let it sit in the fridge for an hour or so it let the flavors meld together.

Now, grab a pair of bluefish fillets and place them in a baking dish. Spread the salsa on the fillets and bake in a 350 degree oven for about half an hour.

mango_salsa

Captain Morgan Spiced Rum Sauce w/ Old English Bread Pudding

I don’t know if you recall, but I mentioned that on Fridays the local Stop and Shop sells its Italian bread for 99 cents a loaf. Well as I mentioned before, I usually pick up two loaves, one to use with soup or pasta which I like to make on Fridays, and the other to save for Sunday, letting it dry out a bit. Some times I slice it up for making stuffed French toasts, and sometimes I use it for making bread pudding. So, I figured this Sunday I’ll make the bread pudding as I was able to stop by Trader Joes and found dried apples and cranberries at a nice price. So, lets whip up a rum sauce with this also, since the memory of Christmas is fresh and rum sauce makes a nice winter treat.

Here’s what you’ll need:

 Bread Pudding –

  • One dried Italian loaf cute into cubes (about 6 cups)
  • 1 ¼ cup of milk
  • 1 large egg beaten
  • 1/3 cup of butter softened
  • ½ cup of diced dried apples ( or other dried fruit)
  • ½ cup of dried cranberries ( or raisins)
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 3 tbsp Captain Morgan Spiced Rum
  • 1 Tbsp nutmeg
  • 1 Tbsp cinnamon

Rum Sauce –

  • 5 tbsp Captain Morgan Spiced Rum
  • 2 oz butter
  • 2 oz flour
  • 2 oz sugar
  • 1 pint of whole milk

Bread Pudding:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

In a large bowl, combine bread and milk, and set aside to soak for 5 minutes. Then stir in egg, butter, fruit, brown sugar, rum, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Combine well, and then press the mixture into a 9-inch square baking pan.

Bake in preheated oven until golden and firm to touch, about 35 minutes. Leave in baking pan to cool.

 

Rum Sauce:

Melt the butter in a saucepan over a medium heat, add the flour and stir to create a thick paste. Cook for a minute taking care not to burn. Using a hand whisk, slowly add the milk, stirring vigorously. Continue whisking until thick smooth sauce is formed it should take about 5 minutes or so. Do not have the heat too high or the base of the sauce may burn. Then add the sugar and whisk until dissolved. Lower the heat and cook for 5 minutes stirring from time to time. Then stir in the rum.

Serve the bread pudding with the warm sauce over it to enjoy a winter dessert.

bread pudding 5

Chicken Schnitzel with Duck Walk White

Chicken thighs are an inexpensive dinner choice. They work well in this recipe as we are going to be pounding the pieces thin. So there is less work when you get the thighs rather than the boneless breasts, and it’s cheaper than getting those thin cut chicken cutlets.  The boneless thighs are best for this recipe, and don’t forget the thick cut bacon from Western Beef.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 4 4oz chicken thighs
  • 1/3 cup of Duck Walk white wine
  • 4 rashers of thick cut bacon
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • ½ tsp minced garlic

Brown the garlic in olive oil and add the bacon. Cook the bacon till well crisp and remove to a paper towel. Now fry the chicken in the rendered bacon fat, garlic bits, and oil. Give each piece of chicken about two minutes per side. Make sure the pan is hot so you get a little burning going on the around the edges of the chicken.

Remove the chicken to a serving plate. Crumble the bacon and sprinkle it over the chicken. Deglaze the pan with the white wine and get that entire flavor into this light pan sauce. Pour the sauce over the chicken and bring it to the table. I like to serve this up with a side of kasha and warm sauerkraut.

duckwalk_vineyards