Carb With a Side of Carbs

Yes it’s breakfast time!

This morning finds me wanting to have one of the bagels that ‘E’ left yesterday.  But I can’t just have a bagel… I’m feeling that for rhe day ahead I’m going to need a little something more. So, I reached into the fridge and found that package of Mexican cheese blend and of course omlette comes to mind. And those two rashers of Polish bacon… we’ll skillet potatoes are a specialty of the house…

#Breakfast

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Autumn is here in New York once again. I always look forward to the cool air and the changing leaves. This season really brings forth the flavors of breakfast. Something salty something smokey something sweet. This morning, with the aroma of fresh apples in the air, I figured I would take a couple of macintosh apples, grate them down, add some batter, and see if I could get some fritters cooking.

So, with about a half an inch of light canola oil in my cast iron skillet, I mixed pancake batter and four medium-sized apples. I took a spoonful and placed it on a sheet of waxed paper and patted it flat with the spatula. Once I had three of these I transfered them to the hot oil and let then cook for about two minutes before flipping them over and cooking the other side.

Now while this is going on I have another small frying pan over a light flame cooking a couple of rashers of bacon. I like mine cooked but not crispy.  Nice and chewy does it for me.

So, as the fritters finish cooking I scoop them out and place then on paper towels to drain off some of the oil.

As the bacon finishes, I transfer that to the plates, with a couple of fritters and pour on a nice drizzle of pure New York grade A maple syrup from a little place just outside of Middleburg.

Jim Beam Bourbon Baked Beans with Bacon

A recipe nick named the killer b’s around here. Well its one more perfect recipe for this new found bottle of Jim Beam Maple Bourbon.
The combination of brown sugar and maple bourbon bring a sweetness to these bean and makes them a perfect compliment to grilled hotdogs with mustard. So, let’s plan a back yard get together and dust off our winter slow cookers!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 bag of great northern beans
  • 1 large sweet potato diced small
  • 1/2 pound of slab bacon diced small
  • 1/2 cup of light brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup Jim Beam Maple bourbon
  • 5 cups of water

Another simple summer recipe, combine all the ingredients into your slow cooker, set it for eight hours. Ding! Beans are ready. Serve them hot or room temperature. I usually let the slow cooker run overnight. Then transfer the beans from the crock pot to the serving bowl and then get the rest of the cookout.

Jim Beam Bourbon Baked Beans with Bacon

Jim Beam Bourbon Baked Beans with Bacon

Jim Beam Bourbon Baked Beans with Bacon

Jim Beam Bourbon Baked Beans with Bacon

Jim Beam and Vanilla Bean

So its back the the lab again. I was at the liquor store the other day just wandering aimless stumbling into boxes when I came across the bourbon section. I’m a fan of Jim Beam and I saw they had something new, a maple bourbon. Now, I was expecting a bourbon with a hint of maple added. What I found in the bottle was a viscous maple syrup with a touch of bourbon added. Is was very sweet and while I contemplated putting it on pancakes, I decided to try it on some ice cream instead. Its seems we have a winner just in time for summer!

Jim-Beam-MapleHere’s what you’ll need:

  • 2 scoops of vanilla bean ice cream, I used blue bunny premium
  • Jim Beam Maple Bourbon

OK, making this creation is terribly easy. Put two well packed scoops of vanilla ice cream into a deep bowl. Then carefully splash the bourbon over it. Garnish with a cherry! Enjoy a taste of Vermont summer treat.

This also works quite well if you skip the dish and put the ice cream on a warm waffle.

Because Sharing is Caring 06

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Tips, hints, tricks, and little kitchen ‘hacks’ learned along the way and shared with you… please feel free to share your hints with me…

  • Beating egg whites
    For the best results when beating egg whites use a copper bowl and a good cooking utensil. Whisk when the eggs have reached room temperature..
  • Beating egg whites
    Egg whites will not whip if they come into contact with fat, grease or egg yolk.
  • Separating eggs
    Its agood idea when separating eggs to have three bowls: one for the yolks, one for the whites and one bowl to separate over so that you won’t have to throw out a whole batch if one yolk breaks while separating.
  • Which egg to use
    Unless the recipe calls for a specific size, assume that all eggs used in recipes are Grade A large.
  • Eggs to room temp
    To bring eggs to room temperature quickly, (they beat better that way), put them in a bowl of warm – not hot – water for 5 to 10 minutes.

So, a couple of hints, tips, take what you like and leave the rest… speaking of leaving… leave a comment to share one of YOUR tips!

Thank You!

Because Sharing is Caring 05

little_chef_1280x800Tips, hints, tricks, and little kitchen ‘hacks’ learned along the way and shared with you… please feel free to share your hints with me…

  • make your own ‘faux’ buttermilk
    combine 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or white vinegar, plus one cup regular milk. Stir together and allow to stand for 5 minutes.
  • make your own tartar sauce
    1 cup mayo, 2 teaspoons sweet pickle relish, 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard.
  • make your own clarified butter
    Melt the butter slowly. Let it sit for a bit to separate. Skim off the foam that rises to the top, and gently pour the butter off of the milk solids, which have settled to the bottom.
  • make your own burger ‘secret sauce’
    Stir 1/4 cup mayonnaise  with 2 tsp prepared relish, 1/8 tsp white wine vinegar, 1/4 tsp onion powder, 1/4 tsp paprika and 1/8 tsp garlic powder and a pinch of salt.
  • Always be cooking!
    You will improve through practice, practice, practice! So lets skip the take-out. Mangia!

So, a couple of hints, tips, take what you like and leave the rest… speaking of leaving… leave a comment to share one of YOUR tips!

Thank You!

Because Sharing is Caring 04

little_chef_1280x800-02Tips, hints, tricks, and little kitchen ‘hacks’ learned along the way and shared with you… please feel free to share your hints with me…

  • Taste!
    Taste early, taste often, and taste all the way through the process.
  • Season as you go
    As food progresses through its cooking, seasonings and moister are being absorbed and redistributed. So, season when you start, season as you go, and season when your done.
  • Season the water, not just the pasta
    when cooking pasta, or boiling potatoes add salt to the water to brighten up the flavors.
  • Serve cheese at room temperature
    Store the cheese in the fridge to preserve its freshness, but let it warm to room temperature before serving to bring out its flavors.
  • Always be cooking!
    You will improve through practice, practice, practice! So lets skip the take-out. Mangia!

So, a couple of hints, tips, take what you like and leave the rest… speaking of leaving… leave a comment to share one of YOUR tips!

Thank You!

Basic Roast Turnips

So, being November, we are inching our way closer to ‘The Big Day’ for giving thanks and I’m repeating myself. But speaking of repeating, have I mentioned turnips? Well they are also nice roasted.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 3 cups peeled, cubed turnips (about 2 big ones)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut the turnips into medium sized chunks. Toss them in a large bowl with the olive oil. Make sure they are well coated. Add the salt and pepper to taste. Spread them on a baking sheet with a lip and pop them in the oven for about twenty minutes, or until tender.

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Basic Mashed Turnips

So, being November, we are inching our way closer to ‘The Big Day’ for giving thanks and eating stuff we really don’t indulge in otherwise. We tend to eat a lot of generic vegetables like corn, beans, and tomatoes, all year round thanks to canning, freezing, and cheap imports from out-of-town. We are losing major parts of our seasonal diversity. Its holidays like thanksgiving and Christmas that help to refocus our taste buds to these often overlooked dishes.

So let’s take a look as some simple seasonal items that often don’t appear on our tables.. like… tasty turnips! A white bulbous root vegetable grown in temperate climates and harvested in fall and enjoyed in fall and winter.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 3 cups peeled, cubed turnips (about 2 big ones)
  • 1 quarts water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons margarine
  • evaporated milk
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Cut the turnips into medium sized chunks. Measure up 3 full cups of them. Bring the water to a boil in a large pot on the stove. Add the salt and sugar. When the water boils, add the turnips. Boil for about 20 minutes, or until the turnips are tender. Drain well. Add the margarine and evaporated milk. Using an old fashioned masher, mash the turnips until they are smooth. Taste and add more salt and plenty of pepper. Makes 4 servings.

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