Captain Morgan Spiced Rum Sauce w/ Old English Bread Pudding

I don’t know if you recall, but I mentioned that on Fridays the local Stop and Shop sells its Italian bread for 99 cents a loaf. Well as I mentioned before, I usually pick up two loaves, one to use with soup or pasta which I like to make on Fridays, and the other to save for Sunday, letting it dry out a bit. Some times I slice it up for making stuffed French toasts, and sometimes I use it for making bread pudding. So, I figured this Sunday I’ll make the bread pudding as I was able to stop by Trader Joes and found dried apples and cranberries at a nice price. So, lets whip up a rum sauce with this also, since the memory of Christmas is fresh and rum sauce makes a nice winter treat.

Here’s what you’ll need:

 Bread Pudding –

  • One dried Italian loaf cute into cubes (about 6 cups)
  • 1 ¼ cup of milk
  • 1 large egg beaten
  • 1/3 cup of butter softened
  • ½ cup of diced dried apples ( or other dried fruit)
  • ½ cup of dried cranberries ( or raisins)
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 3 tbsp Captain Morgan Spiced Rum
  • 1 Tbsp nutmeg
  • 1 Tbsp cinnamon

Rum Sauce –

  • 5 tbsp Captain Morgan Spiced Rum
  • 2 oz butter
  • 2 oz flour
  • 2 oz sugar
  • 1 pint of whole milk

Bread Pudding:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

In a large bowl, combine bread and milk, and set aside to soak for 5 minutes. Then stir in egg, butter, fruit, brown sugar, rum, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Combine well, and then press the mixture into a 9-inch square baking pan.

Bake in preheated oven until golden and firm to touch, about 35 minutes. Leave in baking pan to cool.

 

Rum Sauce:

Melt the butter in a saucepan over a medium heat, add the flour and stir to create a thick paste. Cook for a minute taking care not to burn. Using a hand whisk, slowly add the milk, stirring vigorously. Continue whisking until thick smooth sauce is formed it should take about 5 minutes or so. Do not have the heat too high or the base of the sauce may burn. Then add the sugar and whisk until dissolved. Lower the heat and cook for 5 minutes stirring from time to time. Then stir in the rum.

Serve the bread pudding with the warm sauce over it to enjoy a winter dessert.

bread pudding 5

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Apple and Celery Root Slaw

Picnics are a perfect time to perfect those chilled salads and slaws that remind us that it’s too warm for hot food. So, with picnics in mind I put together two great tastes that should go well together and blended them with a variation of the creamy coleslaw dressing I like to whip up. So lets try the Apple and Celery Root slaw.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1/2 cups mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons chopped tarragon
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated horseradish
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 bulbs (about 1 pound) celery root , peeled and cut into small matchsticks
  • 2  sweet apples (I use Macintosh) apples, cored and cut into small matchsticks
  • 1 large egg, hardboiled and finely chopped

Combine the mayonnaise, tarragon, lemon zest, salt, and horseradish in a medium bowl. Toss the lemon juice, celery root, and apples together in a large bowl and stir in the mayonnaise mixture and egg. Let sit at least 45 minutes before serving.

Bunratty Cranberry Apple Sauce

Since the red cabbage was such a hit… I have another side dish here that goes nicely with pork. It’s a cranberry applesauce made with mead. It’s a ferments wine with honey not grape as its base. Mead was enjoyed by the Four Kings of Ireland in the middle ages after having been introduced by monks. If you can’t enjoy alcohol delivered by monks, well…

There must be something sacrilegious about you.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 4 Granny Smith apples
  • 4 oz cranberries
  • ½ cup Bunratty Mead
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup water

Peel, core, chop the apples and toss in a pot with cranberries, mead, and water. Cook this till the apples are soft and the cranberries have popped. Add the sugar and grab the old fashioned potato masher. Now, some people would have you take this mixture and put it in a blender, or food processor, but I think that this apple sauce works best if you mash it by hand so that the final sauce is not overly processed. It should be more farm house, not warehouse.

This makes a nice side to roast pork… or did I mention that before… I don’t recall, must be this nice mug of warm mead. Did I mention that mead is best served warm? Oh well, that’s another recipe…