Captain’s Liquored Bananas

Bananas ar forty nine cents a pound at Best Yet market this week! So… let’s make some for dessert. I haven’t made bananas foster in quite some time. So, with a fresh carton of vanilla ice cream and some ‘on sale bananas’ let’s get these two together. Now THAT’S cooking with rum!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • 1 tbsp banana liqueur
  • 2 under ripe bananas, sliced in half lengthwise
  • 1/4 cup Captain Morgan spiced rum
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely grated orange zest

Melt butter in a heavy skillet over low heat. Add brown sugar, allspice and nutmeg and stir until sugar dissolves. Add banana liqueur and bring sauce to simmer. Add bananas and cook for 1 minute on each side, carefully spooning sauce over bananas as they are cooking. Remove bananas from pan to a serving dish. Bring sauce to a simmer and carefully add the rum. If the sauce is very hot, the alcohol will flame on its own. If not, using stick flame, carefully ignite and continue cooking until flame dies out, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. If sauce is too thin, cook for 1 to 2 minutes until it is syrupy in consistency. Add orange zest and stir to combine. Immediately spoon the sauce over bananas and serve. Serve with ice cream.

bananasfoster04

Parrot Bay Fruit Salad

With the fourth of July here already, it’s time to think of eating out doors. I know I’ve covered lots of salads and picnic foods here on this blog, but I don’t recall doing much in the way of fruit salads. So, because the where is hot, there’s sales on fruit, and the rum supply is ample… let’s get some things tossed together and put on ice.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • ½ of a pineapple
  • 2 bananas
  • 2 navel oranges
  • 2 kiwi
  • 1 mango
  • 3 tablespoons Parrot Bay coconut rum

Peel, halve, and core your pineapple. Dice up half of it and toss it in the bowl. Peel and slice up the kiwi fruits, and peel, pit and cut up as best you can that mango. I say this which the experience that dicing these stone fruits can be very dicey indeed. Peeling and slicing your bananas is simplicity itself in comparison, so go and do that now…. Tossing the slices in the bowl.

Now for something creative. Cut the top and bottom off the oranges just deep enough to expose the inner fruit. Following the curve of the fruit cut the skin and pith off the orange in panels. Holding the orange over the bowl cut between the membranes to free the citrus segments. Let them fall into the bowl as they are cut free. By hand, squeeze all the juice from the remaining membrane over the fruit, then discard. Repeat with the other orange.

Now, splash this collection of fruits with the coconut rum, about three tablespoons or so, and let this sit in the fridge for a ½ hour or so letting all the flavors meld.

Serve this with a light topping of whipped cream if you like that, or, chiffonade of fresh mint leaves for a slightly different sensation.

fruit-salad

Lydia Buckingham – Cranberry Apple Pie

Another pie adaptation from the Colonial Cookbook, comes from the recipe of Lydia Buckingham of Old Saybrook, Connecticut. This cranberry apple pie would have been cooked in a cast iron Dutch oven over a fire in a kitchen not unlike the colonial kitchen you can see at the William Floyd Estate in Mastic Beach. There is a good deal of wet ingredients in this pie, so break out the pie birds to vent the steam and lets make some dessert!

Here’s what you’ll need:

Filling:

  • ¾ cup cranberries
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup raisins
  • ¼ cup brandy
  • 8 large Macintosh apples peeled, paired, cored, and sliced
  • 2/3 cup of sugar
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • ½ tsp cinnamon

Pie:

  • 1 pie shell
  • 1 piece of piecrust dough for the cover
  • 1 medium egg, 1 tbsp milk, ¼ tsp cinnamon for the wash

Mix the cranberries and brown sugar and let them stand for about an hour. Plump the raisins in the brandy for about an hour. In a large bowl mix the remaining filler ingredients; then add in the cranberry and raisin mixtures. Stir to combine. Place the pie bird in the shell and pour the filling in. cover with an upper crust. In a small bowl whisk the egg, milk, and cinnamon wash. Brush the wash over the crust. Place the pie on a pre-heated 425 degree oven for about 20 minutes. Reduce the oven to 350 degrees and continue baking for about 40 minutes.

This pie is nice to serve warm with a small scoop of vanilla ice cream.

pie-bird

If you get a chance, visit the William Floyd Estate to see a colonial kitchen.

 

Abigail Adam’s Pumpkin Pie

I was going through a book of colonial recipes for the New York / New England region looking for something old / new for me to bring to the table. Well, I came across several dishes that look interesting to me. One of these, Abigail Adam’s pumpkin pie recipe, looks quite good to try. I’m sure its an adaptation, because it calls for a pre-made pie crust, but I think I’m going to like this one because of the quarter cup of dark rum, and I’ll use the Captain Morgans.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Filling:

  • 1 ½ cups of pumpkin
  • ¼ cup of dark brown sugar firmly packed
  • ½ tsp of fresh grated ginger
  • 1 tsp fresh grated nutmeg
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 cup of heavy cream
  • ¼ cup of whole milk
  • ¼ cup of Captain Morgan dark rum
  • 3 medium eggs lightly beaten

Pie:

  • 1 ten inch pie crust
  • Pecans and whipped cream for topping

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Mix the filling ingredients in a large bowl, and then pour it into the pie shell. Give this a minute or two to settle. Then, pop this in the oven and bake at 425 for ten minutes. Reduce the heat to 350 degrees and continue baking for about forty minutes. The pie is done when a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. When done, take it out of the oven, let cool for a moment, and serve it with some real eggnog.

Abigail's pumpkin pie

Abigail’s pumpkin pie

This recipe is adapted from “the Thirteen Colonies Cookbook” – Donovan, Hatrak, Mills, Shull

Indian Style Rice Pudding

What to do with left over rice? Rice pudding! This recipe is based on an Indian version of rice pudding. There is cream, and coconut, pistachios, and a little cinnamon. The sweetness of the cream and coconut milk means you do not have to put in as much of sugar or butter the many traditional rice pudding recipes call for.

Here’s what you’ll need:
• 1 cup cooked long grain or basmati rice
• 1 cup whole milk
• 1/2 cup heavy cream
• 3/4 cup coconut milk
• 2 ounces sugar, approximately 1/4 cup
• 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
• 1 1/2 ounces golden raisins, approximately 1/3 cup
• 1 1/2 ounces chopped unsalted pistachios, approximately 1/3 cup

In a large nonstick sauce pan over medium heat, combine the cooked rice and milk. Heat until the mixture begins to boil. Decrease the heat to low and cook at a simmer until the mixture begins to thicken, stirring frequently, approximately 5 minutes.
Increase the heat to medium, add the heavy cream, coconut milk, sugar, and cardamom and continue to cook until the mixture just begins to thicken again, approximately 5 to 10 minutes. Use a whisk to help prevent the cardamom from clumping. Once the mixture just begins to thicken, remove from the heat and stir in the raisins and pistachios. Transfer the mixture to individual serving dishes or a glass bowl and place plastic wrap directly on the surface of the pudding. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

Peach Sauce

A red pepper sauce, and a blueberry sauce, bet you where thinking of something white to add to our list, but nope, I’m diverting off track once again for something peachy. It was the vanilla ice cream that got me thinking that if I added a bit more sweet to the peach glaze that I often use on pork… by golly it just might work…

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 dash ground nutmeg
  • 1 cup sliced peeled fresh peaches
  • 1 teaspoon amaretto

In a saucepan, bring water, sugar, cornstarch and nutmeg to a boil. Boil this for about a minute to get everything all dissolved. Now add peaches. Bring to a boil and cook for another 1 or 2 minutes. Remove this from the heat and stir in the liquor. Serve over vanilla ice cream.

peach sauce with ice cream

peach sauce with ice cream

National Apple Pie Day

Mother’s Day is national Apple Pie Day… go figure! So, in keeping with the holiday, here’s my contribution to the nation’s apple pie recipe repository. All you need is a touch of the natural maple sugar and a drizzle of natural maple syrup.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  •  1 ready made pie crust ( ok, so I cheat a little)
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup maple sugar
  • 2 Tbsp REAL maple syrup
  • 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
  • 3 lb. Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced (8 cups)
  • 2 Tbsp. butter, cut up
  • 1/4 cup whipping cream
  • 1–2 tbsp. milk
  • 1 Tbsp. raw sugar

In a large mixing bowl combine granulated sugar, maple sugar, maple syrup, flour, cinnamon, salt, and nutmeg. Add apples; toss to coat. Transfer to pastry-lined pie plate. Dot with butter and pour whipping cream over filling. Trim edge of crust even with edge of pie plate.

On the lightly floured surface, roll out remaining pastry to a 12-inch circle. Cut an “x” or a design in the center of the pastry. Place pastry over filling in pie plate. Seal and crimp edges. Cut small slits in top of crust, if desired. Brush with milk and sprinkle with raw sugar. Place pie on a foil-lined baking sheet. To prevent overbrowning, cover pie edges with foil.

Bake in a 375° oven for 40 minutes. Remove foil from edges. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes more or until fruit is tender and filling is bubbly. Cool on a wire rack.

Enjoy this with your Mom!

Carolans’ Rice Pudding

Let’s not forget to have desert, its one of the best parts of any diner get-together. Carolans Irish Cream is produced in Clonmel in County Tipperary, Ireland’s ‘Golden Vale’, and is probably the best natural dairyland in the world. The perfect setting for producing the delicious, rich cream that goes into Carolans. This recipe calls for a little Carolan’s Irish Cream added to me super-secret rice pudding.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • ½ cup uncooked jasmine rice
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup half and half
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup Carolan’s Irish Cream

The real secret here is to soak the rice in water for about half an hour before we start. Now, heat the milk and half / half on the top of a double boiler. Drain the rice and add it to the milk mixture. Then, add the sugar and cinnamon. Cook over the simmering water for about an hour (until the liquid is absorbed). Stir in the Carolan’s and cook another fifteen minutes or so.

Then let this cool down before transferring it to the fridge for a couple of hours of chill time. Serve this in desert bowls with a dollop of whipped cream and dust with cinnamon.