Haddock with Bulmer’s Sauce

My local fishmonger out here had a special on haddock fillets that I couldn’t, no seriously could not, pass up. Besides, I haven’t had un-smoked haddock in a while. Haddock is often found already smoked, but this recipe works best with un-smoked fillets.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 11/2 pounds of haddock fillets
  • 2 cup of Bulmer’s hard cider
  • 1 medium onion sliced thin
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp light cream
  • ¼ cup cornstarch

Divide the fillet into four equal sizes. Place them into a pan add the sliced onion, bay leaf, and lemon juice. Pour in most of the cider, reserving about 2 tablespoons worth for the finishing sauce. Cover, bring to a boil, and then let simmer for about ten minutes. Now, strain about 1 ¼ cups of the liquid from the pan into a measuring cup.

Now, in a small pan mix the cornstarch with the cider, and gradually whisk in the strained liquid, bringing this to a boil. Whisk continuously till smooth and thickened, remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the cream. Season the sauce with a little sauce and pepper and ladle over the fish.

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Bulmers Cider Duck

It’s a blog about Long Island, so there has to be a duck in here somewhere… and this is a wonderful recipe that I usually make in the fall, but its equally at home in March I suppose. The tang of apples and the succulence of duck… brought together with a hard cider sauce.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • A 5 pound duck
  • A bottle of Bulmers original cider
  • 3 granny smith apples cored and diced
  • 2 tablespoons butter unsalted
  • 2 tablespoons or so of flour
  • A rasher of two of bacon

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

Rub your duck with a little salt and pepper and fill its cavity with the diced apples. Secure the flap with skewers and place it on the rack of a good roasting pan. Pour ¾ of the bottle of cider over the duck, and then lay a rasher or two of bacon over it. Pop this into the oven for about 2 ½ hours, basting every twenty of thirty minutes or so. Once the duck is cooked, transfer it to a warm serving platter and let’s make some sauce.

Deglaze the roasting pan over a medium heat with the remaining cider, then lower the heat and add the butter then start adding the flour to create a smooth roux. This is then poured into your gravy boat, and it should really float your duck over there.