Stewed Mushroom Side dish

The rich meaty flavor of mushrooms make them one of the most popular side dishes with most cuts of steak. Although I prefer to use the white mushrooms for this side dish, you could choose to use the meatier portabello.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 pound or so mixed mushrooms
  • 1/2 stick Butter
  • 2 onions, peeled and sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bunch fresh thyme, chopped, or 1 Tablespoon of dried
  • a sprinkle or two sea salt and freshly ground pepper
  • a splash or two of Duck Walk red wine
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream

Trim the mushrooms as needed, removing any tough stems. Cut the larger mushrooms into smaller pieces. Smaller mushrooms may be left whole or simply halved to show off their form. Rinse all the mushrooms well and roll them in a paper towel to dry them off.
Preheat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the butter, onions and garlic. Sauté until the onions just begin to turn golden brown. Add the mushrooms and continue. In a few minutes the mushrooms will release quite a bit of moisture and become a bit soupy.
Add the thyme and salt and pepper. Continue cooking until the mushrooms are tender and most of the moisture has evaporated, concentrating the flavor. Add a splash of wine and the cream. Continue simmering until the sauce has thickened once again. Stir in the green onions.

mushroom

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Paprika Pan Fried Trout

Trout remains one of farmed fishing best kept success secrets. Trout has been ‘farmed’ here on long island for a long time. The Cold Springs Harbor hatchery has been active for 100 years now. The even host there own ‘catch and keep’ program in the waters around Cold Spring Harbor. So, what would be a simple way to handle your trout… how about a Smokey Paprika pan fried fillet.

 

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 or 2 Trout fillets
  • 2 ounces butter
  • 1 plate of all-purpose flour
  • Dash of smoky paprika
  • Salt and pepper to season the flour

 

Mix a dash of smoky paprika with a table spoon or two of flour and place that on a plate.

Dredge the trout fillets through the four and season with a little salt and pepper.

Heat a pan over a moderate high heat and melt the butter. Turn down the heat; do not let the butter burn. Toss the fillets in and listen to the sizzle.

Wait just a minute or two to flip the fillets once the flesh firms up.

Give the fish another minute or two then plate them up.

Serve with fresh veggies and perhaps some skillet potatoes.

pan fried trout

Bulmers Cider and Slow Roast Pork Belly

There is something of a comfort food quality that I associate with slow roasted pork. Whether its ham, smoked ham, shoulder, loin, or in this recipe pork belly. Although this particular cut of pork contains a good dose of fat, the slow roasting process renders that fat down so that most of it doesn’t wind up on your plate, or your belly.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 2 ½ pounds deboned pork belly
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • Salt
  • 1 onion, thickly sliced
  • 1 carrot, roughly chopped
  • 1 stick celery, roughly chopped
  • About 1 ½-¾ cups Bulmers Irish Apple cider
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 cloves

Preheat your oven to 450 degrees

Using a very sharp knife, score the skin of the pork, this helps the fat run off. Take care not to cut all the way through the fat to the meat. Boil a kettle full of water (about 10 cups) and pour it over the skin. Throw away the water and pat the pork dry. This will help the skin crisp up during the cooking. Rub the pork with the canola oil and sprinkle with salt.

Place the vegetables in a roasting dish and put the pork on top, skin side up. Pour the cider and stock around the meat. Toss in the bay leaf, and cloves. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Roast the pork in the center of your oven for 20 minutes, or until the skin is brown and crisp. Reduce the oven to 275 degrees and cook for another 2 ½ hours.

Remove the pork from the oven, transfer it to a plate, and leave in a warm place to rest. Strain the contents of the roasting dish through a fine sieve and place in a pot. Bring it to a boil over high heat and reduce the liquid, skimming all the time, until the sauce thickens and becomes syrupy, about 8-10 minutes.